RSPCA

The Blue House, Reuben & Wrecker

“I’ve had him since he was five weeks and he’s turning three this year. I didn’t know what to call him and then I found him chewing up everything so I called him Wrecker. He’s my best friend. He frets when I’m not around and I do too. Wherever I go I’ll take him with me, share my food with him, everything. He’s so placid and good with children.”

 

       Reuben and Wrecker   Reuben and Wrecker 2

This is Reuben and Wrecker. We had the pleasure of meeting Reuben and Wrecker at The Blue House in Parramatta. Reuben was once living rough on the streets along with Wrecker before The Blue House took them in and helped them get back on their feet. Community Medic took occupation of The Blue House and have transformed it into a safe place for homeless rough sleepers to find support. The Blue House is still working to build an official office, but their doors and services remain open nonetheless. It is a 24-hour information and services premises for people who are homeless. The homeless are welcome at any time to shower, wash and dry their clothes, get emergency bedding, accommodation and support in whatever way needed. Blue House even provides computers with internet access. The best part is that they welcome companion animals, meaning that absolutely everyone is welcome. The Blue House is an incredible place that helps rough sleepers transform their lives. The amazing sense of community often means the people who come through Blue House become family. Community Medic is now looking to open more premises around Australia. We encourage you to learn more about this great organisation at http://www.communitymedic.org.au/

Wrecker

 

 

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5 reasons pets are good for homeless people

Man's best friend

On any given night 105,000 Australians are without a place to call home. That’s 1 in 200, which is already one too many. People can find themselves unexpectedly in homelessness due to health, job situation or financial difficulties, it can happen to anyone. Throughout all this their pets become more important than ever. So how do pets benefit the homeless community?

  1. Pets are companions. Pets provide homeless people with constant companionship. It means that someone is always by their side so they never feel alone, even at their most vulnerable.
  2. Pets love unconditionally. No matter what the situation, pets are always happy to be with their loving owners. Through rain, hail or shine, pets are undoubtedly there to stay by their side and give them support.
  3. They provide a sense of emotional and physical security. Not only can homeless people sleep soundly knowing that they have their pets by their side, but owning a pet gives them a sense of mental stability and normalcy. Having a constant and unwavering source of love and support is so important when times are rough and you don’t know what the next day will bring.
  4. Pets are their best, and sometime only friend. Homeless people go through everything with their pets, and this means their bond can even be stronger than most pets and owners.
  5. Pets give them a sense of purpose. Having someone else to take care of each day provides them with a sense of responsibility and a reason to keep motivated. Pets need to be cared for and establishing a sense of routine can be a small but uplifting process.

At Pets of the Homeless Sydney, we believe in supporting the unique bond between pet and owner, no matter what the situation. More shelters and crisis accommodation centres welcoming animals means a smoother and happier transition for vulnerable Australians to get back on their feet.

Zorro & Jolie

“This is Zorro and Jolie. They’re mother and son. I won’t go anywhere without them.”

Zorro and Jolie

Zorro and Jolie

Zorro and Jolie adore their owner and it was amazing to see them interact and see their unique bond. Luckily for these two dogs, they have found a place to stay in housing commission accommodation. However, it’s not easy to find and many still struggle out on the streets with their animal companions.

Sam & Ty

“I’ve had Ty since he was 2 weeks old and he’s 2 years now. I got him from the pound. I’ve had plenty of opportunities to enter a shelter or home but none of them will take in Ty as well, so I said no. Wherever I go, he goes.”

Sam and Tye

Sam and Tye

We came across Sam and Ty outside Woolworths in Town Hall. Sam has nothing but love and care for his dog and would rather stay out on the streets than be separated from Ty – another example of the unique bond between pet and owner.

The Kennel Project & Jewish House

Long-term kennel structure at Jewish House

Long-term kennel structure at Jewish House

Old kennel facilities to be replaced

Old kennel facilities to be replaced

Jewish House is currently building long-term kennels to provide for the beloved pets of people undergoing crisis. Jewish House is an amazing organisation that provides 24/7 crisis support and services to those who need it. They help a range of people, and luckily, this extends to animals as well. This great news means that struggling Australians have a place to stay and get back on their feet, without having to leave their best friends behind! Jewish House also work alongside Project HoPe (Homeless Pets) with a vet to care for the pets that come in.

 How can you help?

Sponsor the construction of the kennels by donating here and attaching a message for ‘The Kennel Project’ as well as any personal notes – we’d love to hear your thoughts! Every little contribution makes a difference. We will also be adding in a plaque to thank those who choose to donate $300 or more, which will be placed above the kennels. Any bits and pieces like matting, toys and blankets to add to the kennels to make life more comfortable for the dogs will also be greatly appreciated.  Any excess funds that we may be lucky enough to have will go towards ongoing costs of providing for the animals that come in, including food and veterinary services with Project HoPe. Email us at petsofthehomelesssyd@gmail.com to get in touch or feel free to stop by our Facebook page to talk. We can’t wait to hear from you.

This is a truly exciting initiative, as we know there aren’t many shelters that welcome pets, let alone provide for them! Your support will allow vulnerable Australians, including those who are homeless, keep the strong bond between them and their pets, ensuring that they are provided a constant sense of comfort and familiarity as they get back on their feet.

Kennel Construction

Kennels under construction

Jewish House backyard under construction

Jewish House backyard under construction

About The Kennel Project

The Kennel Project is our way to help more shelters and crisis accommodation support vulnerable Australians and the pets they keep. Few shelters open their doors to animals, and the ones that do still need a little help to make every pet’s stay comfortable.

Get in contact with us at petsofthehomelesssyd@gmail.com or chat to us on our Facebook page to keep updated with the progress!

If you are a shelter or know of a shelter that is looking to open their doors to animals, we would love to hear from you. We want The Kennel Project to spread and help more places support the bond between owner and pet.

What the iPhone queue can teach us about the homeless

Line for the iPhone 6

In await of the new iPhone’s recent release, crowds and crowds of people camped outside the Sydney Apple Store on George Street. It’s funny to think that on the same block on the corner of Market and George Street is a makeshift shelter for somebody without a place to call home.

On any given night in Australia, 105,000 people are homeless. So while many excited iPhone fans braved the cold weather and rugged up in blankets and tents for a night, thousands across the nation did too. And sadly they will continue to do so. Especially if they have animal companions and finding shelter is a far-off option.

It was Mission Australia that highlighted this unlikely connection. So they invited the people in that massive line to give a little something back, because if every single person waiting for an iPhone donated what they could, it would make a world of a difference to the less fortunate. Blankets, a can of food, an online donation – it all makes a difference.

For those lucky and dedicated people who lined up to be one of the first to get their hands on a new iPhone 6, it was a strange yet amazing opportunity to feel the struggle of the homeless.

Were you in line to snag one of the new iPhones? How was your experience camping on the Sydney streets for a night?

It’s a chance for all of us to be thankful for a place to call home and do our part for those without a place to stay. Here’s one way to start: donating to Mission Australia. Or even just saying hello and asking how someone is doing the next time you go past George Street. Every little action makes a difference.

People and Pets in Times of Hardship

domestic-violence-help

Crisis can come in many forms. It can be financial or emotional, health or drug related, involve domestic violence and even natural disaster. However, comfort and sanctuary comes in many forms too, and for people in crisis, pets provide unconditional and unwavering support.

Pets are an important member of any family and the broader issue of finding refuge and shelter for both human and animal together effects much more than just the homelessness sector. There is a clear need to shift attitudes to honour the bond between pet and owner, regardless of the situation. The value of sustaining such a relationship is powerful – it provides security, therapeutic benefits and is a standing symbol of hope when all seems lost. And because of this, the importance of pets in times of hardship should never be underestimated.

Fortunately, there are few but still amazing organisations that make the effort to keep people and pets together. The Pets in Peril program by Animal Aid in Victoria to assist families experiencing domestic violence. In an ideal world, refuges would accommodate for the entire family (animals included), but sadly this is not always possible and Pets in Peril has been decided to care for beloved animal companions. Similarly, Safe Beds for Pets by the RSPCA supports families in domestic violence situations. This means families can leave dangerous situations and take the time to make arrangements for the future without fearing for the safety of their pets.

The demand for these kind of outreach services is increasing and while it is reassuring to know that services exist, we are still on our way to create a systematic solution that provides for both animal and human.